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November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014

DISBARMENT

David Greenwald, State Bar #129247, Los Angeles (July 31, 2013). Greenwald, 55, was disbarred for failing to maintain client funds in trust and committing an act of moral turpitude.

In September 2007 Greenwald was hired to represent a client on a contingency fee basis in a personal injury matter. The following January, Greenwald filed suit, and a year later the case settled for $20,000. The settlement agreement stated that one of the defendants would pay the client $15,000, while the other would pay $5,000. In April 2009 the first defendant issued a settlement check for $15,000, which Greenwald deposited into his client trust account. He was required to maintain $8,350 of the settlement funds in the account, but the balance fell below that several times. By June 2009 the account balance was $508. Two months later Greenwald paid his client all the money owed.

In aggravation, Greenwald had a record of prior discipline. Also, he engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing. The order took effect August 30, 2013

Stephen C. Hollingsworth, State Bar #200609, Los Angeles (July 10, 2013). Hollingsworth, 47, was disbarred for failing to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court, and failing to participate in a disciplinary proceeding after receiving adequate notice and opportunity to do so.

In aggravation, Hollingsworth had a record of prior discipline. The order took effect August 9, 2013

Daniel E. Kritz, State Bar #148714, Richmond (July 17, 2013). Kritz, 50, was disbarred for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In aggravation, Kritz had a record of prior discipline, related to multiple acts of wrongdoing. In addition, his misconduct involved acts of dishonesty and failure to obey court orders. In mitigation, Kritz entered into two stipulations and admitted to his misconduct. The order took effect August 16, 2013

Sharon L. Lapin, State Bar #165919, Greenbrae (July 24, 2013). Lapin, 58, was disbarred for failing to competently perform legal services, aiding in the unauthorized practice of law, sharing fees with a nonlawyer, accepting referrals from an unregistered legal referral service, maintaining an unjust action, failing to avoid the representation of adverse interests, and committing acts of moral turpitude. She was charged with 26 counts of misconduct in connection with a scheme to defraud homeowners that involved at least 13 of her clients.

In 2009 Lapin entered into a business relationship with US Legal Services (USLS) as an independent contractor to handle predatory lending lawsuits. Lapin was the attorney of record in more than 130 predatory lending matters, which USLS referred to her. USLS paid Lapin a monthly fee of $250 per client.

However, USLS was not a lawyer referral service registered with the State Bar and did not otherwise operate legally. It amounted to a foreclosure rescue scam, which sought to defraud distressed homeowners.

Due to the high volume of cases, Lapin depended on nonlawyers to draft and file the complaints and other pleadings. Each was a boilerplate pleading that Lapin neither reviewed nor filed. She never met with clients. Instead, she relied on USLS to determine whether the matters had merit. None did; each case was dismissed. Between August 2009 and November 2010 Lapin collected about $177,000 in connection with the scheme.

In aggravation, Lapin had a record of prior discipline. She engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that victimized distressed homeowners and adversely affected the legal system. She showed no remorse for her actions and even rationalized fraudulent activity. In mitigation, Lapin presented witnesses who attested to her good character. The order took effect August 23, 2013

Robert W. Logan, State Bar #198922, Redding (July 24, 2013). Logan, 43, was disbarred for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline and failing to participate in a disciplinary proceeding after receiving adequate notice and opportunity to do so.

In three client matters he was charged with 16 counts of misconduct that included failing to competently perform legal services, failing to communicate, failing to maintain client funds in trust, violating a court order, improperly withdrawing from representation, inducing a client to withdraw a State Bar complaint, and committing an act of moral turpitude. The order took effect August 23, 2013

Eugene W. Matthews, State Bar #161396, Los Angeles (July 10, 2013). Matthews, 49, was disbarred for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline. Among numerous violations of his probation requirements, Matthews failed to timely file quarterly reports, accounting certifications, psychiatric treatment reports, proof of restitution payments, an office management plan, proof that he completed MCLE requirements, proof that he attended ethics school, and proof that he attended client trust accounting school.

In aggravation, Matthews had a record of prior discipline. Also, he committed multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, Matthews cooperated with the State Bar’s investigation, and he performed extensive community service. The order took effect August 16, 2013

John R. Maynard, State Bar #55169, Cedarburg, WI (July 17, 2013). Maynard, 71, was disbarred for failing to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court, and failing to participate in a disciplinary proceeding after receiving adequate notice and opportunity to do so.

In aggravation, Maynard had a record of prior discipline in connection with professional misconduct in Wisconsin. In reciprocal proceedings, Maynard was disciplined by the Supreme Court of Wisconsin for committing acts of moral turpitude, dishonesty, or corruption. The order took effect August 16, 2013

Ashkan A. Motamedi, State Bar #228384, Laguna Hills (July 24, 2013). Motamedi, 46, was disbarred for failing to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

In aggravation, Motamedi had a record of prior discipline. The order took effect August 23, 2013

Christopher L. Persaud, State Bar #262620, Winnetka (July 24, 2013). Persaud, 34, was disbarred for failing to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court; charging and receiving advance fees in connection with loan modification services in violation of Civil Code § 2944.7(a); failing to take reasonable steps to avoid foreseeable prejudice to clients; failing to promptly refund unearned fees; and committing acts of moral turpitude.

In aggravation, Persaud had a record of prior discipline. His misconduct involved 47 client matters and multiple acts of wrongdoing. In addition, he caused financial harm to his clients and the administration of justice. In mitigation, Persaud cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 23, 2013

SUSPENSION

Michael W. Champ, State Bar #95784, Woodland Hills (July 31, 2013). Champ, 59, was suspended for one year and placed on three years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to communicate, and improperly withdrawing from representation.

In 2009 Champ substituted into a plaintiff’s personal injury lawsuit on the eve of trial. The parties settled shortly thereafter. In July 2011 Champ sent his client the release, but he failed to respond to her requests for a status report. Later that month he failed to appear at a final status conference. Subsequently he failed to appear at three Order to Show Cause hearings regarding dismissal, despite receiving proper notice. In October 2011 the court relieved Champ as counsel of record.

In aggravation, Champ had a record of prior discipline. In mitigation, Champ had medical problems during the period of his misconduct. In addition, witnesses testified to his good character. The order took effect August 30, 2013

Kenneth M. Cooke, State Bar #159341, San Diego (July 17, 2013). Cooke, 47, was suspended for six months and placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to communicate with a client, failing to render appropriate accounts, failing to refund unearned fees, and failing to return client papers.

In May 2009 Cooke was retained to represent a client in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy matter. The client paid Cooke $1,200 in advance fees. From September to October 2009 the client called Cooke multiple times asking for status updates but received no response. The next month the client requested a refund, but Cooke failed to provide it. Cooke also failed to file a bankruptcy petition, and he took no legal action on the client’s behalf. He later agreed to refund the unearned fees, but he did not do so until October 2012.

In a second matter, in May 2009 a client retained Cooke to file a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition on her behalf. The client paid Cooke $2,000 in advance fees. Cooke failed to file the petition until late the following September, two days after the client threatened to file a complaint with the State Bar. In October 2009 Cooke appeared at a meeting of the creditors, where he was told he had not provided documents proving his client’s income. Cooke failed to provide the requisite information, and in November 2009 the bankruptcy trustee filed an objection to his client’s plan. The trustee later contacted Cooke to discuss the objection, but Cooke did not respond. Cooke later filed motions on the client’s behalf to determine the value of real property, but the motions were improperly served and required reservice. Cooke filed an amended Chapter 13 plan, but the trustee again objected due to multiple problems. The court later scheduled an Order to Show Cause hearing regarding sanctions, and ordered Cooke to explain his errors. He responded that staffing problems in his office caused the untimely service of his earlier motions.

In July 2010 the client filed a substitution of attorney and terminated Cooke’s representation. In May 2011 Cooke refunded the client’s advance fees. There were four other matters involving misconduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Cooke had a record of prior discipline. He committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that resulted in significant financial harm to his clients. Also, after stipulating to misconduct in certain matters, he continued his wrongdoing. In mitigation, Cooke cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. At the time of his misconduct, Cooke experienced emotional, financial, and physical difficulties. He presented testimony from seven witnesses who were aware of his misconduct and attested to his honesty, integrity, and good character. The order took effect August 16, 2013

Phillip K. Evans, State Bar #208336, Lake Elsinore (July 31, 2013). Evans, 65, was suspended for six months and placed on three years of probation for charging and receiving advance fees in connection with loan modification services in violation of Civil code § 2944.7(a), failing to competently perform legal services, failing to promptly respond to reasonable status inquiries, failing to promptly refund unearned fees, and failing to properly withdraw from representation.

In January 2011 Evans was hired to negotiate a home loan modification on his clients’ behalf for a $1,500 advance fee. Ultimately, Evans did not perform any loan modifications on behalf of the clients, or provide any services of value. In addition, he failed to refund the advance fee. In a second matter, in April 2011 Evans was hired by a client to negotiate a home loan modification for a $900 advance fee. Evans failed to provide legal services and failed to return any portion of the illegal fees.

In a third matter, in March 2011 a client hired Evans to file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy petition for $1,499, and paid him $650 in advance fees. In January 2012 the client contacted Evans to inquire about the status of his petition, but he discovered that Evans’s phone was disconnected and that he had relocated his office. Evans failed to give the client notice that he was closing or moving his office. He did not file a bankruptcy petition, and did not refund any of the advance fees.

In aggravation, Evans committed multiple acts of wrongdoing. Also, his misconduct caused his clients financial harm. In mitigation, Evans had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2000, and he cooperated with the investigation by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 30, 2013

Gaspar R. Garcia, II, State Bar #215762, Sacramento (July 10, 2013). Garcia, 39, was suspended for one year and placed on three years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to keep a client reasonably informed of significant developments, failing to promptly respond to reasonable client inquiries, making misrepresentations, collecting unconscionable fees, failing to promptly release client papers and property after the termination of employment, and failing to cooperate and participate in a disciplinary proceeding.

In July 2007 Garcia was retained by a couple to represent their company, CP2M Inc., in a discrimination lawsuit against the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). The clients paid Garcia $10,000 in advance fees, and provided him with a credit card to pay any costs related to the matter.

In September 2008 Garcia filed a complaint on his clients’ behalf. In March 2010 Caltrans filed a motion for summary judgment (MSJ). The following October the trial court issued a tentative, unfavorable ruling on the MSJ. Although Garcia intended to contest the ruling, he did not notify the court or opposing counsel. As a result, the court sanctioned him $250. Around the same time, his clients sent Garcia a notice from Caltrans regarding their company’s potential decertification from the Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Certification Program. A decertification hearing was set the next month for the same date and time as an MSJ hearing. Garcia failed to file a motion to continue either hearing.

Garcia appeared for the MSJ hearing, but he failed to arrange for representation of C2PM Inc. at the decertification hearing. As a result, the company’s certification was forfeited. The court subsequently granted the MSJ and entered judgment against C2PM Inc. Garcia agreed to file a notice of appeal, but despite receiving an extension he failed to timely file the opening brief. As a result, the Court of Appeal dismissed the case.

Garcia did not inform his clients of the dismissal, or respond to the clients’ attempts to contact him until much later. Further, when he did speak with the clients, he falsely stated that he had nearly finished the opening appellate brief when in fact he had not drafted one, and he failed to inform them that their case had been dismissed.

In November 2011 the clients terminated Garcia’s services and retained new counsel. Garcia failed to respond to inquiries and requests from the new counsel. Between July 2007 and November 2011 Garcia charged and received $284,582 in fees, which was grossly disproportionate to the value of the services he performed. Moreover, Garcia used the clients’ credit card without their consent to charge $205 on behalf of another client. Garcia failed to respond to the State Bar’s investigation.

In aggravation, Garcia committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that caused his clients significant harm. In mitigation, Garcia had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2001. The order took effect August 9, 2013

Michael L. Goolsby, State Bar #159660, Newport Coast (July 31, 2013). Goolsby, 46, was suspended for 90 days and placed on two years of probation for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In December 2010 Goolsby entered into a stipulation with the State Bar regarding three matters that resulted in his suspension from practice. He was required to comply with certain conditions to the discipline. However, he failed to timely meet with his assigned probation deputy, failed to timely submit quarterly reports, failed to pay restitution to several parties and to provide proof of payment to the Office of Probation, failed to provide proof of attendance at a session of ethics school, and failed to take and pass the MPRE.

In aggravation, Goolsby had a record of prior discipline. Also, he engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, he cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 30, 2013

Sheila M. Hathaway, State Bar #229806, Raleigh, NC (July 17, 2013). Hathaway, 58, was suspended for 90 days and placed on two years of probation following her conviction for a crime involving moral turpitude.

In April 2010 Hathaway was cited by police for failing to pay a hotel bill in Los Gatos. In May 2010 she was charged with a misdemeanor and pleaded nolo contendere to violating Penal Code § 537(a)(1), defrauding innkeepers. Two previous cases against Hathaway were dismissed. She was sentenced to two years of probation and required to pay restitution to the hotel and other parties.

In mitigation, Hathaway had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2004, and she cooperated in the investigation and proceeding. At the time of the misconduct, Hathaway was experiencing severe emotional distress. The order took effect August 16, 2013

Nicholas H. Lambajian, State Bar #175420, Monrovia (July 17, 2013). Lambajian, 45, was suspended for 30 days and placed on one year of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to promptly respond to reasonable status inquiries, failing to promptly pay client funds, and failing to promptly refund unearned fees.

In March 2009 Lambajian was hired to file a bankruptcy petition on his client’s behalf. He was paid $2,500 in advance fees and $300 for filing fees. From June 2009 to October 2011 the client requested a status update every few weeks, but Lambajian did not respond. When the client learned that Lambajian had not filed the bankruptcy petition, he terminated his employment and requested a refund. Lambajian did not return any portion of the unearned fees until February 2013.

In aggravation, Lambajian engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that significantly harmed his client. In mitigation, Lambajian had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1994. Also, he entered into a stipulation prior to the formal filing of charges. The order took effect August 16, 2013

Arthur G. Lawrence, State Bar #29554, Newport Beach (July 9, 2013). Lawrence, 82, was suspended for three years and placed on four years of probation for failing to maintain client funds in trust, commingling funds, and failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In aggravation, Lawrence had a record of prior discipline. In mitigation, during the period of misconduct Lawrence experienced extreme physical difficulties. The order took effect August 8, 2013

Raymond R. Miller, State Bar #144398, Castro Valley (July 10, 2013). Miller, 62, was suspended for 90 days and placed on two years of probation for maintaining an unjust action, making misrepresentations to creditors, failing to obey a court order, and committing acts of moral turpitude.

In 2007 the former board chairman of Comptech hired The Law Offices of Wolny and Miller to file an involuntary bankruptcy case on his behalf against the company. The involuntary bankruptcy proceedings were intended to halt Comptech’s dissolution, which the client believed would prevent him from receiving compensation he was owed. Miller and his partner, Thaddeus Zigmund Wolny, contacted creditors to convince them to join their client in forcing an involuntary bankruptcy. In May 2007 they filed the involuntary bankruptcy petition. The creditors, however, quickly notified Miller and Wolny that they wished to withdraw from the proceedings. But the lawyers did not file their withdrawals.

Eventually, the client settled with Comptech, agreeing to release the corporation once it paid him $56,567. Nonetheless, because Miller and Wolny had not filed the other creditors’ withdrawals, Comptech proceeded to involuntary bankruptcy. The client later dismissed the bankruptcy petition after settling with Comptech. Throughout the proceedings, Miller and Wolny used the involuntary bankruptcy case to coerce Comptech into paying their client. In December 2009 the court ordered Miller to pay $10,000 in sanctions to the bankruptcy trustee. The law firm of Wolny and Miller was ordered to pay $40,000 in sanctions. The two lawyers failed to pay the sanctions in full.

In aggravation, Miller harmed the public and the administration of justice. In mitigation, Miller had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1989. Also, he showed remorse for his actions. The order took effect August 9, 2013

Thomas L. Reed, State Bar #122624, Forest Falls (July 31, 2013). Reed, 63, was suspended for one year and placed on three years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, sharing fees with nonlawyers, commingling funds, failing to communicate, and failing to render appropriate accounts. He was ordered to pay $47,730 in restitution.

Reed was disciplined for misconduct in nine home loan modification matters. In each of these matters, he failed to return unearned fees. He failed to render an appropriate accounting in two matters, and in one matter failed to promptly respond to a client’s status inquiries. In addition, he failed to keep another client reasonably informed of significant developments, and he misused client funds by paying personal and business expenses out of his client trust account.

In aggravation, Reed engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that caused significant harm to his clients. In mitigation, Reed had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1986. Also, he admitted culpability for his wrongdoing. The order took effect August 30, 2013

Patrick E. Saffarian, State Bar #217520, San Jose (July 31, 2013). Saffarian, 44, was suspended for one year and until he makes restitution for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In April 2011 Saffarian was placed on three years of probation and required to comply with certain conditions. He violated three of those conditions by failing to timely submit written probation reports, failing to pay restitution, and failing to complete the State Bar ethics school.

In aggravation, Saffarian had a record of prior discipline. He stipulated to 22 counts of misconduct involving five client matters. In mitigation, Saffarian cooperated with the State Bar’s investigation and participated in the Alternative Discipline Program. The order took effect August 30, 2013

Thomas W. Smith, State Bar #93102, Oceanside (July 10, 2013). Smith, 62, was suspended for 30 days and placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to return client papers, and failing to comply with the laws of California.

In January 2009 Smith was hired to file a lawsuit for unpaid wages against his client’s former employer. The client paid $1,875 in advance fees. Smith did nothing on the matter until April 2010, when the client confronted him. Smith then filed a lawsuit, but the client soon terminated his employment. Smith failed to return the client’s file.

In a second matter, in March 2008 a client hired Smith to obtain a restraining order. Smith successfully obtained the restraining order, and prevailed in an appeal. The client requested an award of attorneys fees during the appeal, but Smith did nothing to secure those fees.

In a third matter, in July 2011 the State Bar placed Smith on administrative inactive status, making him ineligible to practice law. However, the next month Smith appeared as co-counsel for a client on multiple occasions. The court later declared a mistrial once it realized Smith was ineligible to practice.

In aggravation, Smith committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that harmed his clients and the administration of justice. In mitigation, Smith had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1980, and he cooperated with the investigation by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 9, 2013

Natalie D. Wang, State Bar #231122, Glendale (July 24, 2013). Wang, 34, was suspended for one year and placed on three years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, making misrepresentations, misleading the court, practicing law in a jurisdiction where she was not licensed to practice, failing to cooperate in a State Bar investigation, and committing acts of moral turpitude.

In 2008 the Law Offices of Lee Salisbury assigned Wang to handle a client’s matter regarding child support and child custody. Wang thereafter made several misrepresentations to the client, including sending false court documents to deceive him into believing that she had filed an Order to Show Cause regarding contempt. She also drafted a document purporting to be a stipulation between the client and his ex-wife concerning the modification of child support. The stipulation contained signatures that Wang forged. Relying on the document, the client began paying lower amounts of child support. His ex-wife then filed an order to hold him in contempt for failure to pay child support.

There were two additional matters warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Wang’s misconduct involved multiple acts of wrongdoing that significantly harmed her clients. In mitigation, Wang cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 23, 2013

Thaddeus Z. Wolny, State Bar #119113, Pittsburg (July 10, 2013). Wolny, 61, was suspended for 30 days and placed on two years of probation for maintaining an unjust action, making misrepresentations to creditors, failing to obey a court order, failing to report sanctions or cooperate with a State Bar investigation, and committing acts of moral turpitude.

In 2007 the former board chairman of Comptech hired The Law Offices of Wolny and Miller to file an involuntary bankruptcy case on his behalf against the company. The involuntary bankruptcy proceedings were intended to halt Comptech’s dissolution, which the client believed would prevent him from receiving compensation he was owed.

Wolny and his partner, Raymond Roy Miller, contacted creditors to persuade them to join their client in forcing an involuntary bankruptcy. In May 2007 the two lawyers filed the involuntary bankruptcy petition. The creditors, however, quickly notified them that they wished to withdraw from the proceedings. But Wolny and Miller did not file their withdrawals.

The client eventually settled with Comptech, agreeing to release the corporation once it paid him $56,567. Nonetheless, because Wolny and Miller had not filed the other creditors’ withdrawals, Comptech proceeded to involuntary bankruptcy. The client later dismissed the bankruptcy petition after settling with Comptech. Throughout the proceedings, Wolny and Miller used the involuntary bankruptcy case to coerce Comptech into paying their client.

In December 2009 the court ordered Wolny to pay $30,000 in sanctions to the bankruptcy trustee. The law firm of Wolny and Miller was ordered to pay $40,000 in sanctions. The two lawyers failed to pay the sanctions in full. When the State Bar investigated the matter and attempted to contact Wolny, he did not respond.

In aggravation, Wolny harmed the public and the administration of justice. In mitigation, Wolny had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1985, and he showed remorse for his actions. At the time of his misconduct Wolny experienced extreme emotional and physical difficulties. The order took effect August 9, 2013

Lauren E. Womack, State Bar #259520, Long Beach (July 17, 2013). Womack, 32, was suspended for 90 days and placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, collecting advanced fees in connection with loan modification services in violation of Civil Code § 5944.7(a), and practicing law in a jurisdiction where she was not admitted to practice.

In February 2011 a client retained Womack to negotiate and obtain a home loan modification. The client paid Womack $3,000 in advance fees. Despite Womack’s repeated assurances that her firm was close to obtaining a deal with the lender, the client’s home was eventually sold at a trustee’s sale.

Two other home loan modification matters warranted discipline.

In aggravation, Womack engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that harmed her clients. Moreover, she demonstrated indifference toward rectification of or atonement for her misconduct, and failed to provide refunds to her clients. In mitigation, Womack cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 16, 2013

PROBATION

James D. Ivey, State Bar #154832, Oakland (July 24, 2013). Ivey, 50, was placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to promptly respond to a client’s status inquiries, and failing to cooperate in a State Bar investigation. In July 2011 a client hired Ivey to prepare and prosecute a patent application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO). Ivey filed the patent application with the PTO in September 2011 but failed to perform any additional work on the matter. Later that month the PTO asked Ivey for missing portions of the application, giving him two months to file the additional items. Although Ivey received the notice, he failed to respond or to tell the client about it. As a result, in November 2011 the PTO deemed the application to be abandoned.

After the client received no response to emails asking Ivey for a status update, he filed a complaint with the State Bar. Ivey received an investigator’s letter regarding the complaint, but he did not provide a written response to the allegations.

In aggravation, Ivey committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that harmed his client. In addition, he demonstrated indifference toward rectification of or atonement for his misconduct. In mitigation, Ivey had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1991, and he cooperated by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 23, 2013

There are no recent disciplinary actions of this type.