MAGAZINE
California Lawyer

DISBARMENT

Ronald E. Behling, State Bar #89042, Los Angeles (June 6, 2013). Behling, 77, was disbarred for misappropriating client trust funds and engaging in acts involving moral turpitude.

In a personal injury case, Behling deposited settlement funds into a client trust account, but he failed to maintain the required account balance. He misappropriated funds in the account to spend on matters unrelated to his clients’ cases.

In a second matter, Behling deposited settlement funds into a trust account and then withdrew them to pay a third party without the client’s consent. When the client attempted to contact Behling, he failed to respond.

In aggravation, Behling had a record of prior discipline. He engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that involved trust funds, causing harm to his clients. In addition, he demonstrated indifference toward rectification of or atonement for his misconduct. In mitigation, Behling cooperated with the State Bar’s investigation and proceedings. The order took effect July 6, 2013

Warren D. Camp, State Bar #152527, Toronto, (June 18, 2013). Camp, 49, was disbarred following his conviction for violating 18 U.S.C. § 1542, making a false statement in an application for a United States passport, a felony involving moral turpitude. The conviction is now final and the State Bar concluded it met the criteria for summary disbarment. The order took effect July 18, 2013
Roy C. Dickson, State Bar #105583, Santa Ana (June 26, 2013). Dickson, 65, was disbarred for failing to competently perform legal services, maintaining an unjust action, misleading the court, failing to communicate with a client, improperly withdrawing from employment, failing to return unearned fees, and committing acts of moral turpitude.

In August 1999 a client employed Dickson to represent him as the defendant in a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) action, and as a debtor in a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Five days after various insurance companies sued the client under RICO, Dickson filed a bankruptcy petition to save the client’s home from foreclosure. The client had no real intention to reorganize under Chapter 11.

Once the client’s home was saved, Dickson moved to dismiss the Chapter 11 petition. Dickson and the client attached false documents to the motion, including a letter threatening to evict the client from his office suites for failure to pay rent. The letters and the threat were fabricated to support the motion to dismiss. The bankruptcy court later imposed sanctions against Dickson and the client, making several findings against them. Dickson then filed a motion to terminate the automatic stay imposed by the bankruptcy petition so that the RICO action could proceed. During the RICO action, the district court granted a motion against Dickson for terminating sanctions, based on his failure to comply with discovery requests. As a result of the evasion of discovery obligations, the district court entered a judgment against the client. The client appealed the decision, and Dickson argued, falsely, in his opening brief that the bankruptcy stay had protected him from the order to compel. In addition, Dickson made other false statements and attached altered documents to his brief. Nonetheless, the appellate court affirmed the district court’s decision. There were two other matters involving conduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Dickson had a record of prior discipline. He committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that were surrounded by bad faith and dishonesty. His repeated failures to comply with discovery orders caused an undue burden on his clients and the administration of justice. By not refunding unearned fees, he showed indifference toward rectification of or atonement for his misconduct. He was also dishonest during his disciplinary proceedings. The order took effect July 26, 2013

John H. Feiner, State Bar #89201, Monrovia (June 18, 2013). Feiner, 61, was disbarred for failing to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

In aggravation, Feiner had a record of prior discipline. In mitigation, he fell ill in 2012, which affected his finances and his ability to comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 18, 2013

Erik S. Gunheim, State Bar #136486, Penngrove (June 26, 2013). Gunheim, 54, was disbarred for failing to participate in a disciplinary proceeding after receiving adequate notice and opportunity to do so. Gunheim was charged with failing to competently perform legal services, failing to respond to reasonable status inquiries, failing to return a client file, failing to cooperate in a disciplinary investigation, failing to cooperate with an insurance adjuster, and failing to pursue a client’s claim for damages. The order took effect July 26, 2013. Afton Lenore Harrington, State Bar # 155095, Roseville (June 26). Harrington, 57, was disbarred for willfully disobeying a court order, failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline, and violating rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect July 26, 2013
Marsha N. Honda, State Bar #100984, Fort Walton Beach, FL (July 9, 2013). Honda, 57, was disbarred for failing to participate in a disciplinary proceeding after receiving adequate notice and opportunity to do so. Honda was charged with failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline, and failing to obey a court order. The order took effect August 8, 2013
Andrew H. Lund, State Bar #130209, Beaver Dam, WI (June 24, 2013). Lund, 54, was disbarred for failing to take reasonable steps to avoid prejudicing a client, failing to refund unearned fees, failing to release client papers, and seeking to mislead a judge.

In September 2011 a client hired Lund to represent him in a marital dissolution. Shortly thereafter, the client reconciled with his wife and informed Lund that he would no longer require his services. He requested a refund of the advance fee, which Lund told him he would receive in 90 days. In January 2012 and for several months the client contacted Lund multiple times about the unearned fee, but never received a refund.

In a second matter, in March 2012 a client hired Lund to represent him in a pending family law case. The following month the client learned that Lund would not be representing him and another attorney had taken his case. In May the client learned that Lund had closed his law practice, although Lund never informed the client that he would be doing so. As a result, Lund constructively terminated his employment with the client. There were eight other matters involving similar conduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Lund had a record of prior discipline. His misconduct harmed clients, and it involved multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, Lund cooperated with the State Bar during its investigation and proceedings. The order took effect July 24, 2013

Clifford K. Mau, State Bar #164305, Honolulu, HI (June 24, 2013). Mau, 52, was disbarred after being convicted in Hawaii of six felonies and two misdemeanors, crimes involving moral turpitude.

In April 2004 Mau engaged in a monthlong crime spree while addicted to crack cocaine. On several occasions, Mau broke into gym lockers at 24 Hour Fitness centers in Honolulu and took personal property, including credit cards, without consent. He was arrested, and convicted in January 2005 of burglary, theft, and identity theft. Mau served time in prison and, from 2004 to 2006, went through extreme financial, familial, and emotional difficulties.

After coming out as a gay man to his traditional Chinese parents, he was shunned by his family and his mother defrauded him of his assets. After Mau was forced to sue his mother to regain the money, he was able to recover his property in 2006. In September 2007 Mau was charged with driving under the influence; he pleaded no contest to DUI the next year. Mau failed to report the criminal convictions to the California State Bar until 2011.

In aggravation, Mau engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that caused significant harm to the victims of his crimes. In addition, he failed to report his convictions within 30 days to the State Bar. In mitigation, Mau had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1993. He entered into an extensive stipulation of facts and conclusions of law, and presented testimony from five character witnesses who knew of his misconduct and attested to his good character. The order took effect July 24, 2013

John G. Platt, State Bar #224628, Shingle Springs (June 26, 2013). Platt, 67, was disbarred for failing to participate in a disciplinary proceeding after receiving adequate notice and opportunity to do so. Platt was charged with failing to maintain client funds in trust, failing to promptly pay client funds, failing to maintain trust account records, failing to render accounts, failing to cooperate in a State Bar investigation, and committing an act involving moral turpitude. The order took effect July 26, 2013
Charlotte Spadaro, State Bar #47163, Riverside (June 6, 2013). Spadaro, 72, was disbarred for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to communicate with clients, failing to return unearned fees, failing to employ means consistent with the truth, failing to avoid interests adverse to a client, and engaging in acts of moral turpitude.

In December 2008 two clients retained Spadaro to represent them in bankruptcy and to obtain home loan modifications. They paid Spadaro $2,200 to prepare and file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy petition on their behalf. Spadaro did not provide the clients with a written fee agreement, but she later gave them a handwritten receipt. Instead of preparing the bankruptcy petition herself, Spadaro had a paralegal do so. The documents were inaccurate and deficient.

The bankruptcy court issued notices identifying the deficiencies. In February 2009 the court ordered the clients to file an Official Form 23, but Spadaro failed to comply with the notice. When three of the clients’ creditors filed motions for relief from the automatic stay, Spadaro filed no response and did not appear at hearings on the motions. Spadaro failed to inform her clients of these developments, and later did not respond to their attempts to contact her.

In June 2009 the clients requested a full refund, but Spadaro did not respond. She eventually signed a substitution of attorney form, and the bankruptcy court dismissed the clients’ case because she had never submitted the required Form 23. The clients then initiated fee arbitration proceedings to recover the unearned fees. Spadaro did not appear at a fee arbitration hearing, but appeared at a subsequent hearing in small claims court, where the clients were awarded $2,730.

There were eight other matters involving conduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Spadaro had a record of prior discipline. She engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing and displayed indifference toward rectification of or atonement for the consequences of her misconduct. In mitigation, Spadaro experienced emotional and physical difficulties during the period of misconduct. The order took effect July 7, 2013

Brion L. St. James, State Bar #181977, Sacramento (June 6, 2013). St. James, 53, was disbarred for sharing legal fees with nonlawyers, failing to competently perform legal services, and failing to promptly refund unearned fees.

In July 2010 St. James was hired by a legal services company owned by nonlawyers to handle a predatory lender lawsuit. The client paid the company advance legal fees, and the company forwarded $500 to St. James. The company filed a complaint on behalf of the client, but St. James failed to perform any work on the matter. There were two other matters involving similar misconduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, St. James had a record of prior discipline. He committed multiple acts of wrongdoing by participating in an organization that defrauded hundreds of troubled homeowners. His misconduct harmed his clients, the public, and the administration of justice. In mitigation, St. James cooperated with the State Bar during its investigation and proceedings. The order took effect July 6, 2013

Gregory F. Stannard, State Bar #108674, Los Angeles (June 18, 2013). Stannard, 56, was disbarred for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to maintain funds in trust, failing to promptly pay client funds, failing to respond to client inquiries, failing to render appropriate accounts, failing to cooperate with a State Bar investigation, and committing an act involving moral turpitude.

In January 2008 Stannard settled a client’s personal injury lawsuit for $140,000 and deposited the settlement funds into his client trust account. He was entitled to 40 percent of the recovery and costs he incurred. After distributing $20,000 to the client, Stannard was obligated to keep at least $61,962 in his client trust account. When the client asked for more settlement funds, Stannard delayed payment until June 2008. In the meantime, the trust account balance repeatedly fell below the required amount. Stannard misappropriated at least $20,000 of the client’s funds.

After making the second disbursement to the client, Stannard was obligated to keep $16,962 in the trust account while negotiating her pending medical liens. Stannard did nothing to resolve the liens for three years, and the balance in the account repeatedly fell below the required level.

When the client learned her medical bills were unpaid, she left messages for Stannard requesting an update. He failed to respond and did not pay the medical liens until 2011. As a result, the medical providers reported the client’s delinquencies to various credit agencies, causing wage garnishments.

There were two other matters involving similar conduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Stannard committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that significantly harmed his clients. In addition, he failed to cooperate with the State Bar during its investigation and proceedings. In mitigation, Stannard had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1983. During the period of misconduct he suffered extreme emotional difficulties. The order took effect July 18, 2013

SUSPENSION

Eve S. Chesbro, State Bar #145698, Pasadena (June 18, 2013). Chesbro, 62, was suspended for 30 days and placed on three years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to deposit funds in a client trust account, failing to promptly refund unearned fees, and failing to render appropriate accounts.

In September 2010 a client hired Chesbro to file a lawsuit for wrongful termination against his former employer. Chesbro informed the client that due to an upcoming hip surgery, she would not be able to file the action until January 2011. However, she failed to file the lawsuit. When contacted by her client, Chesbro assured him that she would file it soon. When the client sent her the filing fees, she deposited them into her own account rather than a client trust account. When Chesbro still had not filed the lawsuit by August 2011, the client terminated her legal services and demanded a refund. Chesbro failed to return the unearned fees until January 2013, after the client had filed disciplinary charges against her.

In aggravation, Chesbro’s misconduct significantly harmed her client. She committed four acts of professional misconduct in two client matters. In mitigation, Chesbro had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1990. Also, she cooperated by entering into a comprehensive stipulation. The order took effect July 18, 2013

Oscar A. DeChavez, State Bar #108605, Santee (June 6, 2013). DeChavez, 64, was suspended for 30 days and placed on one year of probation for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In aggravation, DeChavez had a record of prior discipline. Also, he engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, DeChavez cooperated with the State Bar during its investigation and proceedings. The order took effect July 6, 2013

Howard R. Gottlieb, State Bar #71010, Van Nuys (June 18, 2013). Gottlieb, 66, was suspended for 60 days and placed on two years of probation for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In aggravation, Gottlieb had a record of prior discipline, and he engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, Gottlieb cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 18, 2013

Steven A. Guilin, State Bar #225982, San Diego (July 9, 2013). Guilin, 44, was suspended for ten months and placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to render appropriate accounts, failing to promptly refund unearned fees, and committing an act involving moral turpitude.

In December 2008 a client retained Guilin to represent her brother in an immigration matter. Guilin received $1,500 in advanced fees. Instead of identifying himself to the court as counsel, Guilin filed a petition in pro per for habeas corpus on behalf of his client. He submitted the petition without affording his client an opportunity to review it, and signed his client’s name without his permission. Guilin took no further action in the case, prompting the client’s sister to hire new counsel. In addition, Guilin did not provide an accounting for the fees he received, and he refused to issue a refund. Moreover, Guilin misled the court by submitting the verified petition when he knew his client had not reviewed or signed it.

In aggravation, Guilin committed multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, he had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2003. Also, he cooperated by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect August 8, 2013

Kerry A. Halseth, State Bar #74513, Honolulu, HI (June 6, 2013). Halseth, 69, was suspended for 90 days and placed on three years of probation for failing to comply with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In aggravation, Halseth had a record of prior discipline. Also, he engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that caused harm to clients. In mitigation, Halseth cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 6, 2013

Victor E. Hobbs, State Bar #80191, Lake Forest (July 9, 2013). Hobbs, 78, was suspended for two years and placed on three years of probation for collecting advance fees in a loan modification matter in violation of Civil Code § 2944.7(a), failing to competently perform legal services, failing to inform a client of significant events in a case, and violating a court order.

In aggravation, Hobbs had a record of prior discipline, and he engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing in three client matters. In mitigation, Hobbs provided letters attesting to his good character from a wide range of references. The order took effect August 8, 2013

Rosemarie T. Hollander, State Bar #114175, Fountain Valley (June 24, 2013). Hollander, 67, was suspended for six months and placed on three years of probation for collecting advance fees in loan modification matters in violation of Civil Code § 2944.7(a)(1), failing to competently perform legal services, failing to respond to reasonable client inquiries, failing to render an accounting, failing to refund unearned fees, and failing to cooperate in a disciplinary investigation. There were seven client matters warranting discipline and 18 counts of misconduct.

In aggravation, Hollander’s misconduct caused significant harm to clients and involved multiple acts of wrongdoing. In mitigation, Hollander had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1984. Also, she cooperated by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 24, 2013

Melissa S. Lee, State Bar #195720, Monterey Park (June 10, 2013). Lee, 42, was suspended for two years and until she complies with conditions to a previous order of discipline.

In 2011 Lee was disciplined and placed on probation with certain specified requirements. Thereafter she failed to contact the Office of Probation, failed to develop a law office management plan, failed to file quarterly reports, and failed to submit evidence of completing Minimum Continuing Legal Education classes and Ethics School. As such, her probation was revoked and the previous stay of the suspension was lifted.

In aggravation, Lee had a record of prior discipline. Moreover, she engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that significantly harmed the administration of justice, and she demonstrated indifference toward her misconduct. The order took effect July 10, 2013

Robert D. Little, State Bar #178206, Rancho Cucamonga (June 6, 2013). Little, 46, was suspended for two years and placed on three years of probation following a misdemeanor identity theft conviction in violation of Penal Code § 530.5(a), a crime involving moral turpitude.

In 2007 Little began working as a deputy district attorney at the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office. Between August 2007 and July 2008, he worked with Deputy District Attorney Denise Y. Little.

In July 2009, Robert Little illegally assumed Denise Little’s identity by unlawfully creating false account profiles under her name on two social media websites. He then posted an article from a local newspaper describing allegations that the county DA had engaged in extramarital affairs and sexual relations with numerous women, including several from the DA’s office. The article alleged that the women had been promoted in exchange for sexual favors. Unbeknownst to Denise Little, Robert Little proceeded to invite several of Denise’s friends to “friend” him on the social media sites. In April and May 2010 Robert Little posted comments on Internet blogs related to local politics under Denise’s name. She did not discover the fake profiles until May 2010. In March 2012 Little pleaded nolo contendere to identity theft.

In aggravation, Little’s misconduct tarnished the reputation of the legal profession, constituting significant harm to the administration of justice. In mitigation, Little had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1995, and during the period of his misconduct he suffered extreme emotional difficulties. The order took effect July 6, 2013

Evan A. Nielsen, State Bar #239691, Chandler, AZ (June 18, 2013). Nielsen, 52, was suspended for 30 days and placed on one year of probation for practicing law in Arizona when he was not licensed to practice in that jurisdiction, and for charging and collecting fees when he was not entitled to practice law.

In aggravation, Nielsen had received two prior warnings concerning similar conduct in Arizona: In February 2010 the Arizona State Bar conducted an investigation regarding Nielsen’s unauthorized practice of law. That matter was resolved with a warning letter the following May. A month later the Arizona State Bar again investigated Nielsen for the same issue, which was resolved with an Order of Informal Reprimand. In mitigation, Nielsen submitted evidence of good character, and he cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 18, 2013

Michael Parra, State Bar #216596, Santa Ana (June 18, 2013). Parra, 45, was suspended for six months and placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to deposit client funds in trust, failing to respond to reasonable status inquiries, failing to render appropriate accounts, failing to refund unearned fees, appearing as attorney for a party without authority, and failing to maintain an official membership records address. In December 2011 a client hired Parra to file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy petition; the parties executed a retainer agreement, and the client paid Parra an advance fee. However, Parra did not deposit the fee into a client trust account, nor file the client’s bankruptcy petition. The client made numerous attempts to contact Parra, but he did not respond. When the client terminated Parra’s representation and requested a refund, Parra failed to refund any portion of the advance fees.

There were three other matters involving conduct warranting discipline.

In aggravation, Parra engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that involved trust accounts. He harmed his clients by denying them the use of their funds and delaying their legal matters. In mitigation, Parra had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2001. Also, he cooperated by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 18, 2013

James M. Powell, State Bar #165639, Riverside (June 26, 2013). Powell, 60, was suspended for six months and placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to keep a client reasonably informed, failing to render appropriate accounts, failing to refund unearned fees, failing to take steps to avoid reasonably foreseeable prejudice to a client following termination of employment, and failing to participate in disciplinary proceedings.

In aggravation, Powell had a record of prior discipline and he committed multiple acts of wrongdoing that significantly harmed his clients. In mitigation, Powell cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 26, 2013

Robert Roman, State Bar #93369, Santa Ana (July 9, 2013). Roman, 61, was suspended for 60 days and placed on three years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to keep a client reasonably informed, failing to promptly release client papers and property upon termination of employment, and failing to participate in a disciplinary investigation.

In aggravation, Roman committed multiple acts of wrongdoing. Moreover, he abandoned his client’s matter and allowed it to be dismissed. He then failed to take corrective action, resulting in the client losing her action and seeking new counsel. In mitigation, Roman had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1980. Also, during the period of misconduct he experienced depression. The order took effect August 8, 2013

William F. Vogel, State Bar #119421, Van Nuys (June 6, 2013). Vogel, 57, was suspended for 30 days and placed on two years of probation for disobeying court orders and failing to report sanctions.

In March 2011 Vogel appeared on behalf of multiple defendants for a case management conference before the Los Angeles County Superior Court. The court referred the case to the Alternative Dispute Resolution Program for a voluntary settlement conference. Vogel was given multiple notices of the conference, but he failed to appear. When he failed to appear at a mandatory settlement conference and an order to show cause hearing, the court imposed sanctions of $4,500 against him and his clients. Vogel failed to pay any portion of the sanctions, and did not notify the State Bar of the sanction orders. He also failed to make appearances on multiple additional occasions.

In aggravation, judicial time and resources were expended when the court was made to address Vogel’s multiple violations of court orders. Also, he showed indifference toward rectification of or atonement for his misconduct. In mitigation, Vogel had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1985. He cooperated by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 6, 2013

Katherine M. Windler, State Bar #158899, Denver, CO (June 18, 2013). Windler, 49, was suspended for six months and placed on two years of probation following her conviction for trespassing, a misdemeanor involving moral turpitude.

In March 2011 Windler was observed by a loss prevention officer at a food market in Pacific Palisades placing multiple items into a cart and leaving without paying. When confronted and questioned as to why she had taken the items, she refused to answer. The store determined she tried to take $194 in unpaid merchandise.

Windler was arrested and charged with petty theft (Penal Code § 484) and commercial burglary (Penal Code § 459). She pleaded guilty to trespassing (Penal Code § 602(k)), and was sentenced to 24 months’ summary probation.

In aggravation, Windler would have caused harm to the store had she not been apprehended. In mitigation, Windler had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 1992. She attributed her criminal behavior to a panic attack. The order took effect July 18, 2013

PROBATION

Russell A. Greenman, State Bar #244064, Los Angeles (June 24, 2013). Greenman, 33, was placed on two years of probation for failing to keep his membership records current, holding himself out as an attorney when he was not entitled to practice law, and engaging in the unauthorized practice of law.

In February 2010 Greenman was required to report his compliance with Minimum Continuing Legal Education requirements. Although he had completed the required number of MCLE hours, he failed to report his compliance at the time his membership fees were paid.

The following month Greenman terminated his employment with one law firm and began work on a contract basis for another. However, he failed to update his membership records address. As a result, he did not receive the State Bar’s correspondence regarding his noncompliance. Because he failed to reply to the State Bar’s letters and voicemail messages, the State Bar enrolled him as an inactive member who was ineligible to practice law as of September 2010. Greenman continued representing his clients even though he was not entitled to practice law. In late December 2010 a colleague informed Greenman that he was not entitled to practice law. He promptly contacted Member Services and took the necessary steps to return to active status. He remained ineligible to practice law until January 2011, when he submitted proof of his compliance with the MCLE requirements.

In aggravation, Greenman committed multiple acts of misconduct by failing to update his membership records and engaging in the unauthorized practice of law on at least two occasions. In mitigation, Greenman had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2006. His misconduct did not cause harm to his clients or the administration of justice, and he cooperated by entering into a stipulation. The order took effect July 24, 2013

David A. Luna, State Bar #61953, Los Angeles (June 24, 2013). Luna, 64, was placed on two years of probation for failing to competently perform legal services, failing to respond to reasonable status inquiries, failing to render appropriate accounts, failing to refund unearned fees, and failing to cooperate in a disciplinary investigation.

In aggravation, Luna engaged in multiple acts of wrongdoing that harmed his client. Also, he failed to cooperate with the State Bar during its investigation. In mitigation, Luna had no record of prior discipline since being admitted to the State Bar in 2001. The order took effect July 24, 2013

There are no recent disciplinary actions of this type.